Live updates: Russia’s war in Ukraine

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People walk past metal anti-tank barriers known as "hedgehogs" at Independence Square, on February 2, in downtown Kyiv, Ukraine.
People walk past metal anti-tank barriers known as “hedgehogs” at Independence Square, on February 2, in downtown Kyiv, Ukraine. (Roman Pilipey/Getty Images)

Security measures have been implemented across Ukraine in the face of potential Russian attacks on Friday, which marks exactly one year since the start of Moscow’s invasion.

School classes have moved online, working from home is being encouraged and security patrols have been stepped up in order to minimize the potential impact of Russian strikes.

Ukrainian schools have been advised to hold classes online “as a precautionary measure,” Education Minister Serhiy Shkarlet said in a statement Tuesday.

In Kyiv, a special security protocol has been developed for all educational facilities. Pupils are taking classes online from February 22-24 in the city and the wider Kyiv region, according to the regional military administration.

The decision was made “due to the increased threat of enemy shelling and potential provocative actions on the eve of the one-year anniversary of the full-scale Russian invasion of Ukraine,” it said.

And additional safety measures will also be implemented in the Kherson region in northeast Ukraine, the regional military administration said in a statement Wednesday.

Most public offices and businesses will work remotely, with the exception of critical infrastructure facilities, it said.

The distribution of humanitarian aid and cash payments at post offices will be limited, and law enforcement officers will intensify patrols in places where crowds could gather, the administration said.

However so-called invincibility points, where people can charge their devices and warm up, will work around the clock, it added.

City mayor Ihor Terekhov said it is difficult to predict what Russian forces will do tomorrow.

“A lot of people now ask: what will happen? I cannot say what will happen, because it depends on our opponent, our enemy,” Terekhov said in a video address.

“Nobody understands what is in his head, nobody knows.”

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